hackerspaces

Critical Engineering Working Group EXHIBITION

Decoding Black Magic. Interventions in Infrastructure

Piksel Festival 2021
15th of November to 12th of December

Critical Engineers Working Group exhibition “Decoding Black Magic. Interventions in Infrastructure” will take place from the 15th of November to 12th of December 2021, showing well known artworks plus new works in progress by the artists Bengt Sjölén and Danja Vasiliev.
Black Book of Wireless (2020), Unintended Emissions (2019), Vending Private Network, WannaScry! [work in progress] and FakeDeeper – Portrait of three critical engineers (Bengt Sjölén, 2021)

Black Book of Wireless

The Black Book of Wireless is intended to be a book of the dark magic that antennas and radios is, with pages that are circuits and PCB trace antennas (copper traces on PCB material) and of which some examples are shown in this iteration. The piece tries to describe the physical connection between form and function in high frequency electronics such that all the traditional passive electronic components can be implemented with just the shape of copper on a substrate: a resistor being the thickness and length of trace, a capacitor a gap in a trace, a coil literally being a spiral or coil shaped trace and more obscure shapes like filters, couplers, transmission lines. The more obscure parts of this is things that are not fully understood or even if you can model and simulate how you think they will behave you have to try them out to see how they actually behave. For examples in the pictures see e.g. the UWB antennas that look like little faces or funny cartoon shapes and the fractal antennas with funny shapes and turns trying to maximize their length in a finite space or the Vivaldi antennas curved shapes where the maximum and minimum gaps between the copper bodies define the range of frequencies the antenna is tuned for while not even being connected the input – the input is on the opposite side of the PCB being coupled and in that way conveying the received signal.

Black Book of Wireless receives and decodes radio signals present in the local environment such as Air Traffic transponders for airplanes flying past, AIS transponders from ships, GSM communication between local cell towers and phones, Wifi communication between devices and base stations. Decoded information as well as description of other artefacts such as pcb trace antennas and a software radio system that can be a rogue GSM baase station (the white beagle bone and the white usrp software radio board with gsm antennas) is continuously printed on terminal style min screens distributed across the table.

Unintended Emissions (2019)

Wireless (802.11) Citizen Surveillance Investigation

https://criticalengineering.org/projects/unintended-emissions/

Inserted into urban environs, Unintended Emissions captures, dissects, maps and projects radio emissions invisibly shared by our portable wireless devices.

Unintended Emissions reveals meta-data such as make of device, networks the device previously connected to and Internet connection requests transmitted by the device out into the air, employing two arrays of directional Yagi antennae the project attempts to determine positions of Wi-Fi devices in the vicinity.

Similar to surveillance and tracking systems such as StingRay, Unintended Emissions places mobile Wi-Fi users on a 2D map indicating the kind of device user has, time of appearance, user’s network activity and other user-specific meta data. This information can be further analyzed to determine the user’s identity and movements within a locality and the Internet.

Using methods and technologies known to be deployed by federal, surveillance initiatives, the intervention seeks to engender a “healthy paranoia” in the interests of an increased techno-political subjectivity.

Vending Private Network

A vending machine for selling VPN internet access via gateways located four countries not involved in FIVE- NINE- ELEVEN-EYES internet surveillance program.

https://criticalengineering.org/projects/vending-private-network

Virtual Private Networks (VPNs) have come into increasing demand in recent years, providing route encryption through hostile networks. In China, Vietnam, Turkey and Pakistan they also serve to mitigate government censorship, such that foreign sites otherwise blocked by state firewalls are made available to VPN users (Twitter, Facebook, Wikipedia, activist sites and digital libraries being the most common).

Vending Private Network takes the form of a condom vending machine, such as those typically seen in public toilets, nightclubs and bars. Equipped with mechanical buttons, a coin-slot and USB ports, it offers 4 VPN routes, each with an animated graphic depicting the route as a fantasy destination.

Audiences are invited to insert a USB stick into the slot, a coin (1 pound or euro) into the machine, and to select a VPN destination by pressing a mechanical button. In doing so, a unique VPN configuration file is then written to the USB stick. Special instructions (in the form of a README.txt) are also copied, explaining how to use the VPN in a special ‘sheathed’ mode that evades detection methods (namely Deep Packet Inspection, or DPI) used by corporations and state-controlled infrastructure administrators. This is the only means known to work against state controlled firewalls.

Vending Private Network is especially designed for use in wealthy countries; only then can its ulterior motive come into play: leveraging economic and cultural privilege to benefit those less fortunate. With each VPN config paid for, another ‘shadow config’ is generated, to be later shipped to dissidents, activist organisations and others in Turkey, China, Vietnam, Afghanistan, Iran (other countries to be confirmed) such that those that need it most can enjoy protection and access to the open web.

The coins inserted into the vending machine also directly fund the VPN running costs, whose tally is displayed on each screen of the vending machine. Should a particular VPN not have enough money deposited to pay for monthly server hosting costs, it is shutdown, with a white on black notice on the display that it no longer functions due to insufficient public funding. Should money sufficient to cover costs be donated the dormant server will boot back to life and public service continues.

Just as one might expect to see on a condom vending machine, Vending Private Network is adorned with the sticker “Get Protected”.

WannaScry! [work in progress]

WannaScry! is a video-conferencing server that operates from an exhibition venue and publicly displays and stores video calls conducted through it. Real-time and recorded video-chat are projected inside a Palantir*-like scrying ball.

*Palantir is a Techie Software Soldier Spy, Big Data’s scariest, most secretive unicorn in Silicon Valley1

https://vimeo.com/manage/videos/523667524

FakeDeeper – Portrait of three critical engineers (Bengt Sjölén, 2021)

Photo manipulation has existed as long as photography has existed. Recent research has leveraged machine learning to do things such as face swap to replace the face of a person in a video with another persons face or to be able to drive one persons face with the motion of another face thereby e.g. making it look like a persons says or a reacts in a way that they didn’t do.

With our visual culture, in news, politics, social media etc, the ultimate proof of that something actually happened, or what someone actually said, has for many decades been the moving image documenting the event – what used to be perceived as the unquestionable absolute truth.

We have now rapidly moved into a time where this is no longer the case, where images and videos are malleable and easily edited to misrepresent events, to literally put words in someones mouth that they never uttered, or place people at a scene in which they never were.

This obviously has far-reaching implications in a society that puts the ultimate trust in the image be it a surveillance camera, a news coverage or a video posted on social media. FakeDeeper demonstrates this in a simple and direct way by having the face of a visitor drive the faces on 3 still images making them move their mouths, pose and facial expressions as the visitor does in front of the camera in real time. The live situation also allows for weird deformations and glitches and the possibility to easily break the illusion in ways that a deliberate fake video production would of course edit away but then also hints at artefacts that can reveal the fake while also emphasizing how much can be done easily with readily available code, machine learning models and only still images and a webcam.

Current variant:

3 screens (or a projection) shows 3 faces. A camera tracks faces of visitors in the space in front of the three screens. As the system locks to your face the 3 faces on the screens start moving in concert as your face does – you control all 3 faces in concert, if you smile they smile, if you lean your head to the right they do to, if you open your mouth they open their mouths mimicking you. The faces can be glitched and deformed e.g. by hiding part of your face, make strange faces or turning it almost away from the camera making it hard for the machine learning system to catch the pose and expression on your face. This also means that typically as you turn and walk away from the camera the last frame would typically be a weird deformed and glitched triptyc of faces.


Urinotron, Bio-kunst Workshop | Friday 15th – Sunday 17th of November

Urinotron is a large-scale installation that takes our organic waste (urine!) and transforms it into power. Contribute your urine and then put your feet up as the salts in your liquid gold turn into sustainable pee power. Urinotron combines scientific equipment, engineering skills, reels of electronic wires in an artistic equivalent of an alchemist’s workshop will be producing a different kind of gold.

Friday 15th – Sunday 17th November

  • Urinotron, Sandra and Gaspard Bébié-Valérian(FR)
    Friday 15:00 – 19:00
    Saturday 12:00 – 19:00 – with a break
    Sunday 12:00 – 14:00

The project is declined according to the contexts it is hosted. For Piksel festival, a unic workshop will be organized to build a new version of the Urinotron, collectively made and opened to improvements or inventive skills. As energy is one of the most important stakes of our society, working together around the Urinotron will offer the opportunity to think about other energetic models and why we are flushing such a valuable resource.

The general shape of the Urinotron crosses the aesthetics of alchemy, the assembly of heterogeneous elements such as glass, steel, copper, carbon, aluminium, coal and constitutes a clandestine laboratory within which are assembled tanks, electrodes, batteries, cables. This great whole can be likened to a giant microbial battery, functional and whose objective is not so much to reproduce or improve existing research in laboratories on this subject but rather, through a symbolic and artistic bias, to develop a setting criticism of the technique to test the limits and create, then, a material judgment on the industrial and capitalist context about bioenergies.

The challenges associated with the energy transition engage us to rethink our uses, our consumption patterns and industrialization in our societies. From household appliances to transportation, from the management of public lighting to the optimization of web pages (a google search would be equivalent to a boiling water pot), each gesture is the object of the calculation of its carbon footprint and its cost energy. The hyper-industrialization and the abstract nature of pollution and global warming (micro-particles, gases, spatials and elusive temporalities on an individual scale) produce a shift, a decoupling between the production of energy and its use. The growing intermediation of these circuits plays a role in the loss of consciousness of each person’s place. Yet as basic, unlimited and easily adaptable resources, renewable energies open up a resilient economic model.

The intention of this project, symbolic and concrete, points the balance of power between a dominant, centralized electricity production and a microelectricity produced by each one of us, recyclable, reusable aand sustainable. This form of resistance to this economy in tension can be found outside, also, of the exhibition context, and makes it possible to think the project with a nesting in the public space within which the installation would maintain its specificity but would be connected to common uses, useful and to rethink the public space and its uses.


Piksel19 is supported by the Municipality of Bergen, Arts Council Norway, Hordaland Kommune, Community of Madrid, Austrian Embassy, Acción Cultural Española, Inaem, Pro Helvetia and BEK.


Workshops announcement. Piksel19 – e/co,li:b-re.bel

Piksel19 is proud to present the workshops from the 17th festival edition. Download Workshops PDF program Ranging from bioart workshops which target environmental and ecological issues, the smart city technotopias and video manipulation software created for and by artists, all mixed with DIY electronics and, artistic approaches.
Send us an email if you want to attend to piksel19(at)piksel(dot)no with the name of the workshop.

“Urinotron” is an installation that can produce electricity at a local or even micro-local level, from an organic waste, familiar but intimate, the urine. The workshop shows how to build up an Urinotron from scratch.

Cy Keener travelled to the Arctic to deploy RGB light and temperature sensors through sea ice, he is using these open source electronics and data at his installation Digital Ice Core. At his workshop he will train the participants on every DIY sensor that he uses to do this project.

Mapping Smart Futures the smart city technotopias focusing in South Korea and its smart cities as a case study. In the workshop attendants will unpack the omnipresence of technology in the ‘green’, sustainable, and clean cities and by applying Open Source Intelligence tools, citizen forensics and grassroot journalism we want to look at the current state of internet infrastructure in Scandinavia, with a special focus on Norway.

Invisible Ecologies Lab: wind instruments. The Wind Instruments Lab proposes to construct different environmental sensors and explore different sound processes for environmental and meteorological analog data to form a WindSynthLoop, a wind interactive electronic music instrument.

EXCERPT video manipulation software. Visual artists need to screen videos of high quality in many different contexts: from clean video work presentation, single channel video in gallery, a series of video for musical support, audiovisual performance with real time video handling, use of pre-recorded material and real time generated images. Excerpt can do all that.

The workshop Sounding Feet explores how small postural changes of a dancer can be used to control music. From an artistic point of view, this interactive relationship links the musical outcome of interaction to the proprioceptive awareness of a dancer and it exposes to an audience through the auditory modality a dancer’s minute movements that might be visually hidden. The project follows an approach that combines musical ideation, dance improvisation, interaction design, and engineering. Through this combination the development and design decisions (e.g. the characteristics, number and position of force resistive sensors) can be informed by artistic criteria.


Piksel19 is supported by the Municipality of Bergen, Arts Council Norway, Hordaland County, Community of Madrid, Austrian Embassy, Acción Cultural Española, Inaem, Pro Helvetia and BEK.


Expirator and Touching sound, performance and workshop by Pierre Berthet (BE)

26th of May Performance @Piksel Studio 207 – At 20:00

Expirator (reversed vacuum cleaner) by Pierre Berthet (BE)

27th of May Workshop @Piksel Studio 207 from 14:00 – 18:00

Touching Sound by Pierre Berthet (BE)

To sign for this workshop write an email to piksel19(at)piksel(dot)no

WORKSHOP

Touching Sound, a workshop by Pierre Berthet (BE)

Listen what we touch

touch what sounds

sounds knead ears

ears catch time

Ingredients:

tin cans, water, steel wires, bamboo, plastic bags, tubes, dead plants, D.C. motors, sea shells, snail shells, stones, buckets, filter queen, hooks and gloves, balloons, straws, bottles…

Things own time are objects

they own space, they own time.

We walk with sounds in our hands

on our head

in our mouth, moving tongues while singing

moving lips while blowing

blow blow blow


SIGNAL TO NOISE, Curator: Tincuta Heinzel Exhibition program 2019 Piksel Studio 207

Official opening 24th of May from 19:00 – 23:00

Exhibition dates: 25th of May – 16th of June (Mondays closed)

Opening hours: 15:00 – 18:00

Bergen 2019

“I remembers the radio broadcasts from London during World War II and Norway’s king stiffening the resolve of his subjects under German occupation. ”
Judith Haaland, 98

The Paraset (Paratrooper radio set) was one of the most notorious of all the transceivers used by the partisan clandestine radio operators during WWII. Often transported in food baskets, suitcases, and other obscure places, it was used for clandestine radio communication primarily in Norway and Europe. The equipment is known as the “Paraset” because it was dropped by parachute for field agents. A fascinating piece of history.

With this exhibition Piksel wants to make an homage to the radio as a device and also to the importance of the listeners. In a historical moment where the FM analogue radio has been shot down and there are voices that claims that “Norway is not prepared for this.” and “Of course there is a lot of nostalgia in radio. That’s one of the reasons this switch is so controversial.” Piksel wants to bring some fresh air doing both, recalling the analogue radio and bringing new low-cost digital technologies to the people, radio-makers and emitters.

SIGNAL TO NOISE
One of the well known examples of Victor Papanek’s “designs for the real world” is that of a radio receiver for the third world. Produced from very simple, “cottage” like materials, such as an used juice can, paraffin wax and a wick as power source, the radio was non-directional, receiving any and all stations simultaneously. “But, as Victor Papanek will comment, in emerging countries, this was then of an importance: there was only one broadcast (carried by relay towers placed about fifty miles apart”. And, as Papanek continues, “It was much more than a clever little gadget, constituting a fundamental communication device for preliterate areas of the world. After being tested successfully in the mountains of North Carolina (an area where only one broadcast is easily received), the device was demonstrated to the Army. They were shocked. “What if a Communist”, they asked, “gets to the microphone?” The question is meaningless. The most important intervention is to make information of all kinds freely accessible to people.”

This story of the non‐expensive, locally adapted produced radio receiver is the starting point for an exhibition and a workshop which deals with different aspects of radio broadcasting: From the way a radio receiver and a radio transmitter are produced to radio infrastructure, and from the delivered information to the means of questioning its accuracy and validity. The exhibition will consider a historical perspective, but will mostly bring into discussion researches related to the present forms of radio infrastructure and radio phenomena, as well as strategies and tactics of radio‐based interventions.

List of works and artists:
Repertories of (in)discreetness
Tincuta Heinzel & Lasse Scherffig

∏‐Node Platform

Embodied RF Ecologies
Afroditi Psarra

Workshop
Do your own radio!
∏-box : streaming and local FM radio broadcasting with a raspberry pi
∏‐Node

Piksel Fest Spill is supported by the Municipality of Bergen, Arts Council Norway, the Wallonie-Bruxelles International and Rumanska Kultur Institutet.

Repertories of (in)discreetness
Tincuta Heinzel & Lasse Scherffig

Largely used during the Soviet Revolution, the “new” communication mediums of the beginning of 20th century’s played an important role in the Soviets’s propaganda strategy during the 1917‐1918 revolution [3]. The same strategy was equally adopted during the installation of the communist regimes in Eastern Europe. The policies at the time have encouraged the production and the acquisition of radio devices by a large number in order to ensure the impact of the propaganda, while in the same time, the content of the broadcasting was subjected to a strict control.

Using this infrastructure, the USA and their Western alliances were trying to counter the communist propaganda. The creation of Radio Free Europe aimed to deliver “truth” and “objective” information. In the same way, radio phenomena (like interference) were used as technical interventions.

Repertories of (in)discreetness project has its starting point in the archives of Radio Free Europe from the Open Society Archives in Budapest. It questions the act and mechanisms of archiving “the Other”, with a focus on the European “East”. The project discusses the ways in which information is collected and transferred, the ways in which the East has gained an epistemic body through refraction. Thus we would like to point out the relation between nature of the information, the production of knowledge and its reception.

Radio Free Europe is considered unique in the annals of international broadcasting: acting as surrogate domestic broadcaster for the nations under Communism. It also relied on local official media and informal news in order to broadcast what was considered objective information. Due to their wish to outline an exhaustive portrait of the world behind the Iron Curtain, Radio Free Europe Archives give way to a series of questions:

What did the archives not capture and what rests uncatalogued and unverified? And, if something was indeed captured, how was it transformed through archiving? What parts of this composite portrait sketched by Radio Free Europe still survive today? And is this portrait only a mirror image resulting from the media war between East and West? By raising these questions, our project looks to divert and to put into a sensible perspective the act of collecting, organizing and using information, in order to question the nature of the information itself.

Documentation link: http://ro.tranzit.org/en/exhibition/0/2015-03-18/repertories-of-indiscreetness References: 3. Nicholas Reeves, The Power of Film Propaganda: Myth or Reality (London: A&C Black, 2004).

∏‐Node Platform

Fig 5. ∏-Node Installation, Orleans (2015).

∏-Node is an experimental platform for hybrid Web/FM radio-phonic composition. As a multi‐dimensional radio infrastructure platform, ∏-Node explores the narrative, involves participation, and imaginary possibilities of radio through the use of both historic and new, digital technologies.

∏-Node aims to explore the many dimensions of radio’s format and diffusion: its physicality (ether, radio waves, and the electromagnetic spectrum), its spatiality (bandwith, frequencies), its infrastructure (network of radio receivers/emitters), its methods of creation and editorial content management (programming boards/teams, recording studios), its methods of metadata reception (RDS/SDR), its history (radios libres and pirate radio movements), its legislation. Most importantly, ∏-Node also wishes to examine radio’s future at a time when everything is moved towards “the digital”.
The interconnectedness of these various dimensions, tools, and networks allow for the establishment of a decentralized and hitherto unseen diffusion structure, where each of the network’s nodes serve to both receive and diffuse information. Such a structure creates a break with the classic one-way radio format, substituting it with a horizontal peer‐to-peer model that creates room to play with new potentials for multi‐ diffusion and superposition, as well as room to rethink the radio network’s topology.

Embodied RF Ecologies
Afroditi Psarra

E-textile installation and sound performance

Following my quest to embody the invisible transmissions that surround us, in this wearable I explore the use of an IC mixer circuit to down convert the emissions from the NOAA weather satellite and make them audible. By continuing my research into textile antennas and fractal geometry as a means to detect radio-frequency (RF) transmissions, I aim to speculate about the body as an agent of power in a post-capitalist world, and to re-interpret transmission technologies through handmade crafting techniques.

Teaser video here: https://vimeo.com/326116349


Facebook is not internet

Facebook is not internet
In my last visit to Mexico I realized wifi connection was all over the city (a city of 22 millions of people!) wow, that was a great thing! The surprise was yet to come, the internet connection only permitted to browse through facebook, if the info is not in FB then you can not access.

Yes, we all know about it but, did we experienced that raw news beating right in our nose? Not me, at least.

Then I realized that FB is taken all our content (yes, we all knew that), all our videos, all our discussions (impossible to trace or search), all our pics (which becomes just a number in the FB data base and are impossible to trace either, not even the author or anything) and the worst of it: you can not make advanced searches in FB content, cause it is awful. Of course soon, Mark will make a good search engine, then we all be captives forever.

Meanwhile our webpages languish, our pic galleries are not visited anymore, good bye to our statistics visitor numbers, etc. And see who is the one getting advantage to all our followers? Yes, FAcebook.

So, this is a test to keep updating our pages, and hopefully to recover our visitors to our pages and to our content. Let’s see what happens.


Pure Data Synthesizer OPEN workshop

Servando Barreiro

In this workshop, among other more advanced things, the attendants are going to learn the basic building blocks of a classic synth.

barreiro1
Concretely we are going to study and hack a clone of the beautiful and simple ¨moog werkstatt¨ synth which is an experimental limited edition synth. As it´s name indicates, this is a perfect synth to hack, improve, modify and also to learn about basic ¨clean¨ analogue subtractive synthesis.

To register send an email to: piksel14(at)piksel(dot)no
More info: http://14.piksel.no/2014/10/26/pure-data-synthesizer-workshop


PiksteriaLab – Open LAB

PIKSTERIA LAB – OPEN CALL to participants

Bring your own ideas, interests, knowledge and tools.
10-15th november – Bergen Kjott
More info: http://14.piksel.no/

“From 10th to 15th november, PIKSEL14 – be\O/art festival is presenting PIKSTERIA LAB a biohacking lab open to all citizens interested at experimenting new models for knowledge sharing and collaboration building, in the emergent artistic practices related to bio, nanotechnology and science related to Bergen and surrounds.”

**Contents
Open BioElectronix and BioSonification
During this sessions we’ll continue on various prototypes connecting plants to puredata, making sound with fishes, connecting brain-measurements to glitch visuals and generally exploring the possibilities of monitoring the processes of life using open source hard/software.

Water Monitoring
Water monitoring, purification and analysis has been important nodes throughout our activities of the last few years.

Hackteria / Lifepatch Evergreens
You wanna build a DIY microscopy? Or join us for some basic DIY Fermentation or the Art of making Wine, bubble sonification? Join us anytime and we’ll introduce you to some of the all time classics!

8bit Mixtape 0.8 and beyond
The idea was to create a synthesizer from an affordable programmable chip that is playful and could be used by anyone to play the music. 8-Bit Mixtape is using a mathematical expression into a single line of programming code which generates Algorithmic symphonies. In this workshop participants will be invited to identify basic electronic components, soldering the correct way and how to add sound into the synthesizer.

**Schedule 10 – 15. Nov / Pre-Piksel
10. Nov: If you can’t build your Lab you don’t own the Lab
11h | Introduction of all participants and start lab making!

11 – 13. Nov: DIWO Biohacking (Do it with Others)
11 – 17h | Every day DIWO PiksteriaLab .
16 – 18h | Open sessions. join us, discuss with us, bring some something, make something
— Nights | spontaneous and improvised late night biotinkering as much as needed…
— Project work, collaboration, discussions & mini-Workshops

14 – 15. Nov: Open PiksteriaLab
11h – 17h | Every day DIWO PiksteriaLab .
16 – 21h | Open sessions for all piksel peeps who want to be in a lab
— Nights | spontaneous and improvised late night biotinkering as much as needed…
— Jamming with the Living Elektro & mini-Workshops

**Registration
Register by mail to Piksel Team: piksel14@piksel.no – First come first serve.
Other questions can also be directly send to marc@dusseiller.ch
Slots for full participation are limited. Everybody is welcome to join and visit the open sessions.

Please, provide us a few sentences about yourself (short bio).
Why are you interested in the DIWO biohacking session?
Can you join all days of the PiksteriaLab (11-17h)?
Do you want to start another node to work, collaborate on and share?
What kind of lab-tools, organisms, hardware will you bring the lab?

More info at: http://hackteria.org/wiki/PiksteriaLab_2014_-_Bergen


Call: Hacker Space Fest 2009

=============================================
/tmp/lab announces the second Hacker Space Festival
(Paris, 26-30 June 2009)
=============================================

Hacker Space Festival 2009 | Call For Proposals | HSF2009

In 2008, we organized HSF[1] on the spot, as an ad-hoc meeting for
hackerspaces-related networks, technical and artistic research emerging
from them and social questionning arising from them. This sudden
experiment proved to be a huge success, as much as on the
self-organizing level as on the participants and meetings quality, as
well as the emotionally-charged ambient, the kind of which you make
fond memories.
(continue reading…)


  • 2 days ago

    Piksel
    For the first time, the Critical Engineering Working Group are opening their workshops to the online realm. It is a unique opportunity to join Danja Vasiliev and Sarah Grant this Friday and Saturday for the hands-on workshop using Hotglue. On the 10th and 11th of December Bengt Sjölén and Danja Vasiliev will work together again to lead the workshop Selfhosted. Join us sending an email to piksel21(at)piksel(dot)noWeb-pages made with HOTGLUE never look the same - each page is a new creation of its author.Hotglue by Critical Engineering Working Group / Danja Vasiliev and Sarah Grant3-4 December 2021 – 15:00-17:00 hours.piksel.no/2021/05/19/hotglueBuilding websites using Hotglue is fun – and a great, hands-on way to learn about visual design, markup language and hyper-links that power the web. But to do so, one – more so than ever – needs proficiency in the language of the web (HTML, CSS and JavaScript) in order to participate.Hotglue is a FOSS “What you see is what you get” editor for the web. At the workshop a free-to-use grass-roots service Hotglue.me will be used to allow quick hosting of webpages.HOTGLUE Content Manipulation System is a unique tool for DIY web-design and Internet samizdat. System design is based on several fundamental rules primarily aimed at preserving visual homogeneity between editing and viewing modes. This structural transparency of HOTGLUE UI permits its users to disregard any separation of Content and Design and /ultimately/ to remove Design as such from their creative practice.Danja Vasiliev and Gottfried Haider believe that modern web-users shall be given an easy yet powerful, online (in-browser) authoring tool for making exciting, personally distinct and otherwise odd web-pages. Page contents suddenly become something more then only text blocks and images; user begins to construct web-pages as multi-layered collages where textual is visual and vice versa. Web-pages made with HOTGLUE never look the same - each page is a new creation of its author. ... See MoreSee Less
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    2 days ago

    Piksel
    Did you know that you can still visit the Critical Engineering Working Group Exhibition `Decoding Black Magic; Interventions in Infrastructure´ at Kulturhuset 2, C Sunds Gate, every day 13-18h (apart from Mondays)?We will also allow private visits at other times with selected appointments. Let us know when is a good time for you to visit, and the bogeyman will be here waiting for you.Email for more detailspiksel21(@)piksel(.)no ... See MoreSee Less
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    2 days ago

    Piksel
    3-4 December 2021 – 15:00-17:00 hours.Web-pages made with HOTGLUE never look the same - each page is a new creation of its author.JOIN us at the HOTGLUE workshop by Danja Vasiliev and Sarah Grant this Friday and Saturday! We will learn to build decentralized websites using Hotglue. It is fun - and a great, hands-on way to learn about the otherwise hidden structures and exchanges that power the web. HOTGLUE developers believe that modern web-users shall be given an easy yet powerful, online (in-browser) authoring tool for making exciting, personally distinct, and otherwise odd web-pages. Page contents suddenly become something more than only text blocks and images; user begins to construct web-pages as multi-layered collages where textual is visual and vice versa. Web-pages made with HOTGLUE never look the same - each page is a new creation of its author.To attend send us an email to piksel21(at)piksel.no. The workshop will be online through a BBB video chat. We will send the information on how to connect. ... See MoreSee Less
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    3 days ago

    Piksel
    “Samizdat: I write it myself, edit it myself, censor it myself, publish it myself, distribute it myself, and spend time in prison for it myself”, Vladimir BukovskyThe term ‘samizda’ was coined as a word game by the Russian poet Nikolai Glazkov in the 1940’s. He included the note ‘samsebiaizdat’ (self-published) in the copies he types of his poems. HTML SAMIZDAT is a web creation proposal made directly from the browser, collective, open and instantly visible. Using the web as a support and canvas, it is proposed to create a joint site, a samizdat, through the appropriation of html code and multimedia objects. To do this, we will use the Hotglue tool, developed by Gottfried Haider and Danja Vasiliev, and worm.org.You only need a computer with Firefox browser installed to participate. Programming and code skills are not required.To attend send us an email to piksel21(at)piksel.no. The workshop will be online through a BBB video chat. We will send the information on how to connect. ... See MoreSee Less
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